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The Yogic response to any crisis- Living in Balance - Sacinandana Swami maharaj


As humans we have responsibility - etymologically, that means the ability to respond. We can thus cooperate with nature. Nature always looks to restore balance. Whether it is an ecological crisis, a crisis in relationships, or a health crisis, the cause is always that something has gone out of balance. The equilibrium has been disturbed. And to attain wellbeing means to re-establish balance. Modern civilization has learned to seamlessly assimilate vice - mass scale violence and slaughter of animals, exploitation of women, excessive intoxication, and rampant lying – even in highest circles of leadership. Nowadays, this is so customary, it’s often not even considered objectionable. Nevertheless, the imbalance of values has left us with a massive karmic debt. In ancient Greece the priests of Apollo at the temple in Delphi would remind visitors of an important principle: Nothing in excess. Living in balance is either done voluntarily or involuntarily. When we live in balance, all is well. The Bhagavad-gétä (6.17) recommends: “One who is balanced in eating, sleeping, working and recreation attains freedom from all miseries.”

THE MAIN MESSAGE OF ANY CRISIS

Life clearly teaches an open-minded person to search for inner satisfaction over illusory, outer enjoyment, by looking for balance in four areas of life:

  1. ON A SPIRITUAL LEVEL – take care of your soul’s nourishment everyday with sacred practices.
  2. ON A PHYSICAL LEVEL – establish robust physical health and a resilient immune system.
  3. ON AN EMOTIONAL LEVEL – look for meaningful personal relationships and stop the negative inner noise by remaining focused on your positive goals
  4. ON A SOCIAL LEVEL - give back to society by actively contributing to the wellbeing of others.

To willfully integrate such habits is like learning a new language - at first it’s very difficult, but after some time, one enjoys the benefits.